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Agenda and draft minutes

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Contact: Ayshe Simsek, Acting Democratic Services & Scrutiny Manager 

Media

Items
No. Item

151.

FILMING AT MEETINGS

Please note that this meeting may be filmed or recorded by the Council for live or subsequent broadcast via the Council’s internet site or by anyone attending the meeting using any communication method. Although we ask members of the public recording, filming or reporting on the meeting not to include the public seating areas, members of the public attending the meeting should be aware that we cannot guarantee that they will not be filmed or recorded by others attending the meeting. Members of the public participating in the meeting (e.g. making deputations, asking questions, making oral protests) should be aware that they are likely to be filmed, recorded or reported on. 

 

By entering the meeting room and using the public seating area, you are consenting to being filmed and to the possible use of those images and sound recordings.

 

The chair of the meeting has the discretion to terminate or suspend filming or recording, if in his or her opinion continuation of the filming, recording or reporting would disrupt or prejudice the proceedings, infringe the rights of any individual or may lead to the breach of a legal obligation by the Council.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The  Leader referred to the notice of filming at meetings and attendees noted this information.

152.

Apologies

To receive any apologies for absence.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Apologies for absence were received from Councillor Bull.

 

There were apologies for lateness from Councillor Hearn and she arrived just as item 3, urgent business was starting.

 

153.

Urgent Business

The Chair will consider the admission of any late items of Urgent Business. (Late items of Urgent Business will be considered under the agenda item where they appear. New items of Urgent Business will be dealt with under Item 24 below. New items of exempt business will be dealt with at Item 31 below).

Additional documents:

Minutes:

There were no items  of urgent  business put forward.

154.

Declarations of Interest

A Member with a disclosable pecuniary interest or a prejudicial interest in a matter who attends a meeting of the authority at which the matter is considered:

 

(i) must disclose the interest at the start of the meeting or when the interest becomes apparent, and

(ii) may not participate in any discussion or vote on the matter and must withdraw from the meeting room.

 

A Member who discloses at a meeting a disclosable pecuniary interest which is not registered in the Register of Members’ Interests or the subject of a pending notification must notify the Monitoring Officer of the interest within 28 days of the disclosure.

 

Disclosable pecuniary interests, personal interests and prejudicial interests are defined at Paragraphs 5-7 and Appendix A of the Members’ Code of Conduct.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

There were no declarations of interest put forward.

155.

Notice of Intention to Conduct Business in Private, any Representations Received and the Response to any such Representations

On occasions part of the Cabinet meeting will be held in private and will not be open to the public if an item is being considered that is likely to lead to the disclosure of exempt or confidential information. In accordance with the Local Authorities (Executive Arrangements) (Meetings and Access to Information) (England) Regulations 2012 (the “Regulations”), members of the public can make representations about why that part of the meeting should be open to the public.

 

This agenda contains exempt items as set out at Item [25] : Exclusion of the Press and Public.  No representations with regard to these have been received.

 

This is the formal 5 clear day notice under the Regulations to confirm that this Cabinet meeting will be partly held in private for the reasons set out in this Agenda.

 

 

Additional documents:

Minutes:

There were no representations received at the agenda publication stage in relation to exempt items on the agenda.

156.

Minutes pdf icon PDF 362 KB

To confirm and sign the minutes of the meeting held on 21st January 2020 as a correct record.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

RESOLVED

 

To approve the  minutes of the Cabinet meeting held  on the 21st  of January 2020 as a correct record of the meeting.

157.

Matters Referred to Cabinet by the Overview and Scrutiny Committee

Additional documents:

Minutes:

There were no matters referred to by Overview and Scrutiny as part of this item. The Overview and Scrutiny budget recommendations would be considered with item 9.

 

158.

Deputations/Petitions/Questions

To consider any requests received in accordance with Standing Orders.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Deputation from Paul Burnham - Consultation on Service charges

 

Mr Burnham put forward representations concerning the 2020/21 Budget report and 2020 – 2025 MTFS, objecting to the proposed increase to the rent charges for the Council’s 18 affordable rent tenancies within the Housing Revenue Account and further objecting to proposed increases in service charges as no consultation had taken place.

Mr Burnham commended the Council on its policy for supporting social rents rather than affordable rents and highlighted that there were still 18 properties with affordable rent tenancies, paying 80% of normal market rents and paying double the rate of Council rents. The deputation did not want these tenants to be forgotten and contended that they should be included in the Council rents scheme. The deputation expressed that the Mayor of London had created confusion on the definition of social rents and asked the Council to use the social rent formula as required by government guidance and not to set the rents at cap.

The deputation requested that the Council be open on how it sets every social rent in the borough, as this was the only way to provide certainty that they were charging tenants normal Council rent and no more.

Mr Burnham continued to object to the proposed services charge increases for tenants and leaseholders. He contended that the evidence was incontrovertible that something had gone wrong with converted properties cleaning service charges. The tenants were charged 12 months before the service began. He highlighted that there were tenant’s charges for the leaseholder contribution in this financial year and Council tenants were set to pay leaseholder contributions for next year as well. This was while leaseholders were also paying contributions. In the deputation’s view, this was a revenue driven service and they recommended that the Council deliver this particular service at nil charge to the tenants next year. The deputation felt that this proposal was justified, once Cabinet Members examined the figures.

The deputation highlighted that there was one service charge that had been consulted upon. This was the consultation was undertaken on estate parking. The deputation called on the Council to publish these findings. They contended that the results would demonstrate tenant’s rejection of new and additional charges and would also reject the subsidy argument which was the main focus for the increase in charges.

The deputation asserted that tenants and leaseholders would not be spilt and were unified in wanting a say in the charges being put to them. There was £18m of proposed income arising from charges made to residents without a consultation.

The deputation concluded by asking the Cabinet to work with residents instead of against them, especially with the current government in place. The deputation called on the Cabinet to make the proposed changes put forward by them and offered to work with the Council to make these changes.

The Cabinet Member responded to the deputation, thanking them for the issues that they had raised which were noted.

It was the Cabinet Member’s  ...  view the full minutes text for item 158.

159.

2020/21 Budget and 2020-2025 MTFS Report pdf icon PDF 989 KB

[Report of the Director of Finance. To be introduced by the Cabinet Member for Finance and Strategic Regeneration]

 

Cabinet received a report on the Draft Budget on 10th December 2019 which highlighted an outstanding budget gap to be resolved between then and now and also proposed that Cabinet agree to start consultation. The 2020/21 Budget and 2020-2025 Medium Term Financial Strategy (MTFS) now proposed have due regard to the corporate Equalities Impact Assessment, consultation feedback and recommendations from the Council’s Overview and Scrutiny Committee.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Cabinet Member for Finance and Strategic Regeneration introduced the report which sought approval to the proposals concerning the 2020/21 Budget and five-year Medium-Term Financial Strategy (MTFS). The budget aimed to provide a clear financial plan during this unprecedented period of uncertainty for Local Authority budgeting.

 

The Cabinet Member was pleased to announce that the budget gap of £0.6m, highlighted in the last budget report to Cabinet, had been bridged without needing to make any further reductions to Service budgets.

 

The Cabinet Member outlined two transposition errors within table 8.6 of the budget report for Cabinet to note

  • In column 5 (31/3/23), the first line should read £1,270,764, not £12,709,764. The subtotal should read £1,285,516 not £12,724,516.
  • In column 7 (31/3/25), the second line should read £8,221 not £82,211. The subtotal should read £1,525,796 not £1,599,786.

 

These errors were purely presentational, and the underlying figures which have been used throughout the Council’s MTFS model were correct. They would be corrected in the final version of the report to Full Council. It was also noted that they were portrayed correctly in the Treasury Management Strategy Statement that had been considered at Overview and Scrutiny and has just been approved by Corporate Committee.

 

The Cabinet Member continued to outline how the budget was continuing to support the manifesto commitments and the progress made in relation to:

 

  • The Council Tax Reduction Scheme (CTRS) which was extended to a maximum of 100% for least well-off families with children.

 

  • Ongoing investment into a school meal pilot and a youth services programme, a large portion of which has been used to fund the Summer Holiday Programme which offered more than 150 activities with 19,602 young people taking part.

 

  • A funding commitment of more than £4m to ensure that staff providing care services to adults through our partner organisations are paid at least the London Living Wage.

 

  • Increasing apprenticeship numbers within the Council and across other organisations within the Borough.

 

  • To invest £50m in our school buildings over the next 5 years.

 

  • Secured more than £60m funding from the Mayor of London to support this housing programme.
  • 750 additional trees to be planted in the next couple of years and are investing more than £6m in a School Streets programme aimed at reducing pollution around our schools.

 

The Cabinet Member was pleased to be able to propose a balanced Budget for 2020/21 which did not utilise any balances and enabled the Council to invest funds to continue to deliver the shared Borough Plan outcomes and make the Borough a place to be proud to live and work in.

The Leader invited Councillor Connor, Vice Chair of Overview and Scrutiny to further present the Scrutiny budget recommendations which were included at appendix 11 of the attached report.

Cllr Connor outlined that the specific budget scrutiny recommendations were mainly around risk of delivery and further noted the Cabinet’s response to these concerns.

 

Cllr Connor was pleased that last year’s recommendation to provide more detailed information on the capital programme  ...  view the full minutes text for item 159.

160.

Borough Plan 2019-2023 year 2 delivery plan pdf icon PDF 227 KB

[Report of the Director for Customers, Transformation and Resources. To be introduced by the Leader of the Council]

 

This report sets out what will be delivered in the second year of the Council’s four-year Borough Plan (2019-23), including resource and budget considerations. It also looks back at what has been delivered in the first year of the plan.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Leader introduced this report which set out what would be delivered in the second year of the Council’s four-year Borough Plan (2019-23), including resource and budget considerations. It also looked back at what had been delivered in the first year of the plan.

 

The Leader highlighted that the report focussed on what the Council had achieved so far, and what the Council needed to focus on in the year to come. There was a lot to be proud of. For example:

  • On housing, the Council have restarted Council house building in Haringey and hired the people to deliver this ambitious programme; As of May, 350, of the first 1,000 planned Council homes will have started on site.
  • From April this year, more care workers across Haringey would be paid the London Living Wage of £10.75 an hour – giving them the pay they deserve and further boosting spending power in our local economy.
  • The real strides made to bring Council services in-house again.

 

The Leader noted there was still more to do, and that the Council was ambitious and optimistic about what can be achieved .The report demonstrated that real change was possible, that the Council was making real progress.

 

In response to questions from Councillors Hare, das Neves and Palmer, the following information was provided:

 

  • Regarding recording base line satisfaction levels for park improvement, the Leader confirmed that the Council would continue to improve on that level, year on year.

 

  • Regarding improving cycling infrastructure in the borough, the Leader noted this was the intention of the Council, however, consultation with residents was necessary on any proposed routes and that took time to complete. It was the aspiration of the borough to improve environmentally friendly transport options, such as improving cycling infrastructure. The Borough Plan outlined the steps the Council would take to becoming a healthier, active and greener place. Wherever possible, the Council would consult with residents to ensure that their views were considered in any proposals.

 

 

  • Acknowledging the delay between the Fairness Commission’s consultation events and its reports publication date, the Leader noted there was a set process that needed to be adhered to in the production of the Fairness Commission’s report. That process included ensuring that those who participated in the consultation were satisfied with the report’s outcomes. The Leader assured that residents would be consulted in the future on the Fairness Commission’s progress as their views were integral.

 

  • Regarding 1.6 – ‘Ensuring an appropriate mix of new supply in terms of family sized homes and supported/specialist housing’ Officers apologised for the apparently missing information and would explore locating and providing this information.[ It has since been clarified that the information against points 1.4 and 1.5 also applied to point 1.6 and that this was a presentational issue with the pagination of the report pack]

 

 

  • Regarding the High Road West Scheme, the Cabinet Member for Strategic Finance and Regeneration noted the Council were in ongoing discussions with the Mayor of London to include more social  ...  view the full minutes text for item 160.

161.

Asset Management Plan pdf icon PDF 181 KB

[Report of the Director of Housing, Regeneration and Planning. To be introduced by the Cabinet Member for Finance and Strategic Regeneration]

 

This report presents the Council’s new Asset Management Plan for the period 2020-25 and recommends its adoption.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Cabinet Member for Finance and Strategic Regeneration introduced the report which provided an overview of the Council’s Asset Management Plan and would cover a five-year period from 2020-2025.

It was noted that the Asset Management Plan (AMP) was an important tool in achieving the Council’s policy and service ambitions. The AMP is part of the capital strategy and is the context for capital investment decisions, setting out major initiatives and priorities for capital investment, as well as investment required for compliance and carbon management planning.

The Cabinet Member outlined that the plan’s focus is how the Council uses its land and property assets to deliver its Borough Plan priorities. This plan provided this important overview and included a number of important principles and plans which were already in place .The plan also included the Council’s new Disposals and Acquisitions Policy. The Cabinet Member advised that in some areas there is more to do, so the outcome of further work and future decisions will be incorporated in the first annual review of the plan.

In response to questions from Councillor Barnes, the following information was noted

 

  • There were no reduction in services arising from, potentially, locating a swimming pool on the Wood Green Library site.

 

  • With regards to the consideration of fire safety in Council homes and inclusion of sprinklers as a potential addition and cost for future assets in the AMP, the housing revenue account business plan had set aside funding for fire safety measures in Council homes. The Council still needed to await outcome of the changes to building regulations following the Grenfell fire. It was not fully certain if it will be a requirement for buildings to have sprinklers. Also it would be important to await other potential additional recommended works as fitting in sprinklers would, in itself, be disruptive to tenants and leaseholders. If further regulations were issued for additional safety works, this could mean taking forward two lots of works. Therefore, there was a need to have clarity on this from the government before any action was taken. The budget included an allocation for a prudent sum to make changes when they come through but at the moment the Council could not second guess the changes to regulations in respect of fitting sprinklers.

 

 

RESOLVED

  1. To adopt the Asset Management Plan 2020-2025 (“AMP”) summarised at paragraph 6 and as attached as the Appendices 1 and 2 of this report.

 

  1. To agree the Acquisitions and Disposals Policy set out in Appendix 1 (main AMP) section ‘Acquisitions, Disposals and Void Property’ and as summarised at paragraphs 6.4 – 6.5.

 

  1. To agree the strategic recommendations of the commercial portfolio review set out in Appendix 1 (main AMP) section ‘Commercial Portfolio’ and as summarised in paragraph 6.6 and 6.7.

 

Reasons for decision

In August 2018, the Chartered Institute of Public Finance & Accounting (CIPFA) published its Strategic Asset Management Framework guidance for local authorities. The proposal to adopt and publish an Asset Management Plan as part of the  ...  view the full minutes text for item 161.

162.

Wards Corner Policy Advisory Group Report on the options for the future management of the Seven Sisters Market - NON KEY pdf icon PDF 171 KB

[Report of the Director of Housing, Regeneration and Planning. To be introduced by the Cabinet Member for Finance and Strategic Regeneration]

 

The report seeks Cabinet to note the work of the Wards Corner Policy Advisory Group (PAG), which was established to review the options for the future management of the Seven Sisters Market in Tottenham Green Ward, in response to ongoing concern regarding the current management of the market.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Cabinet Member for Finance and Strategic Regeneration introduced this report which asked Cabinet to note the work of the Wards Corner Policy Advisory Group (PAG), which was established to review the options for the future management of the Seven Sisters Market in Tottenham Green Ward, in response to ongoing concern regarding the current management of the market.

 

At the outset, the Cabinet Member stressed that the Council had no ownership of the Seven Sisters Market and that the PAG’s recommendations were not for the Council to implement. It was hoped that the key stakeholders would work together to ensure the recommendations were met.

 

The Cabinet Member informed that he had worked with Tottenham Ward Councillors to commission the independent review and enable this important conversation on the future management of the Seven Sisters Market to take place with key partners and stakeholders. As PAG, we have been very clear that we want the Seven Sisters Market, which includes the Latin Village, to be the best it can possibly be and recognise the social value that it brings to Haringey. That was why, even though the Council itself has no ownership or management role in the market, we recognise that the status quo was not working for all parties and we are committed to engaging with all the key stakeholders to find a sustainable solution for the future management and operation of the market that enables this important trading community to thrive in the future.

 

The Cabinet Member informed that, in recommending the Partnership Model as the proposed solution for future management and operation of this market, the review had considered the particular circumstances that the Seven Sisters Market finds itself in and balanced the importance of social value with the requirement for a viable operation. The PAG was confident, therefore, that the Partnership Model combined the benefits of an operator model with the right governance oversight from the key stakeholders.

 

The Cabinet Member highlighted that the approach was entirely consistent with the Community Wealth Building objectives of the Borough Plan which sought to build the strength, depth and wealth of our local economy and our Business Pledge to support SME businesses. And, it was vitally important that the key stakeholders came together to develop this model further to suit their combined requirements and aspirations.

 

The Cabinet Member was pleased this work had engaged with key stakeholders, including the majority of permitted traders as well as Grainger, TfL, the Mayor of London, the Assembly Member for Enfield and Haringey, Council Officers and Tottenham Councillors past and present in an effort to balance the needs and interests of all parties.

 

On behalf of PAG, the Cabinet Member paid a special thanks to the key stakeholders for their participation in this critical review and invited them to work collaboratively to implement all of the review’s recommendations and ensure a successful Seven Sisters Market.

 

In response to questions from the Leader, Cllr Brabazon, Cllr Hare, Cllr Ibrahim, Cllr Chandwani, and Cllr Hakata,  ...  view the full minutes text for item 162.

163.

Admission to Schools – Determined Admission Arrangements for 2021/22 pdf icon PDF 234 KB

[Report of the Director of Children's Services. To be introduced by the Cabinet Member for Children and Families]

 

This report recommends that Cabinet determines the Council’s admission arrangements for the academic year 2021/22.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Cabinet Member for Children and Families introduced the report which outlined the statutory decisions required to determine the Council’s admission arrangements for the academic year 2021/22. The full range of reasons for agreeing the decision were set out from paragraph. 4.1 - 4.3 of the report.

 

RESOLVED

 

  1. To determine the Council’s admission arrangements for the academic year 2021/22 as set out in Appendices 1 – 4.
  2. To agree the in-year fair access protocol (IYFAP) as set out in Appendix 5 to come into force from 1 March 2020.

 

  1. To agree that the determined arrangements for all maintained primary and secondary schools in the borough are published on the Council’s website by 15 March 2020 with an explanation of the right of any person or body, under the School Admissions (Admission Arrangements and Co-ordination of Admission Arrangements) Regulations 2012, to object to the Schools Adjudicator in specified circumstances.

 

Reasons for decision

The School Admissions Code 2014 requires all admission authorities to determine admission arrangements every year, even if they have not changed from previous years. Regulation 17 of the School Admissions Regulations 2012 also requires admission authorities to determine admission arrangements by 28 February in the determination year.

In addition, the Regulations require the admission authority (in this case the local authority) to publish on its website by 15 March in the determining year the determined arrangements of all maintained primary and secondary school and academies in the borough, advising the right to object to the Schools Adjudicator, where it is considered that the arrangement do not comply with the mandatory provisions of the School Admissions Code 2014.

The Council consults on its admission arrangements annually irrespective of whether or not there is a proposed change to the arrangements. This is to ensure transparency and openness on the contents of the admission arrangements and to allow all stakeholders to make representations which can then be considered as part of the determination of the arrangements.

Alternative options considered

This year we are not proposing a change to the oversubscription criteria for community and VC schools. While there are other ways admission arrangements can influence the allocation of school places set out in the Schools Admissions Code 2014 (e.g. designated catchment areas, identified feeder schools or giving priority in our oversubscription criteria to children eligible for the early years premium/ pupil premium), no alternative option is being considered at the time of writing this report.

 

 

164.

The future of Stamford Hill Primary School pdf icon PDF 256 KB

[Report of the Director of Children's Services. To be introduced by the Cabinet Member for Children and Families]

 

This report sets out the result of the statutory representation period on the proposal to amalgamate Stamford Hill Primary with Tiverton Primary School.

 

 

The Chair of Overview and Scrutiny has agreed that the call-in procedure shall not apply to this decision as the action being taken is urgent and time critical and any delay in implementation caused by the call-in procedure would seriously prejudice the Council's or the public's interests. This is in accordance with Part 4, Section H, Paragraph 18 (a) and (b) of the Council Constitution.

 

 

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Cabinet Member for Children and Families introduced this report which set out the result of the statutory representation period on the proposal to amalgamate Stamford Hill Primary with Tiverton Primary School.

 

The Cabinet Member highlighted that this report was the final in a series of reports that had been presented to Cabinet over the amalgamation of Stamford Hill Primary with Tiverton Primary. All required consultations had now taken place and the report sought the formal agreement of Cabinet to agree the amalgamation from September 2020.

 

RESOLVED

 

  1. To note that no comments or objections were received during the 4-week representation period despite consulting widely with all relevant parties.

 

  1. To note the revenue budget to operate Stamford Hill Primary School successfully in the future is severely diminished with the school’s very low pupil numbers.

 

 

  1. To note the equalities impact assessment at Appendix 4.

 

  1. To approve the proposal to amalgamate Stamford Hill Primary School with Tiverton Primary School. This will mean the closure of Stamford Hill Primary School from 31 August 2020 with displaced pupils transferring to Tiverton Primary School at the beginning of the 2020/21 academic year.

 

The Chair of Overview and Scrutiny has agreed that the call-in procedure shall not apply to this decision as the action being taken is urgent and time critical and any delay in implementation caused by the call-in procedure would seriously prejudice the Council's or the public's interests. This is in accordance with Part 4, Section H, and Paragraph 18 (a) and (b) of the Council Constitution.

 

 

Reasons for recommendation

 

Following an ‘inadequate’ inspection judgement by Ofsted in November 2018, the Regional Schools Commissioner, on behalf of the Secretary of State and the Department of Education, placed a directive academy order on the school. Since April 2016, the Department has issued directive academy orders to maintained schools that Ofsted has rated as inadequate. Its aims for these schools to open as sponsored academies.

 

Significant concerns were raised about the long-term sustainability of Stamford Hill Primary School in terms of the vulnerability of its financial stability and its historic ability to attract pupils to the school. Based on the low level of demand for school places locally and the expected future declining demand, the Council considers that Stamford Hill Primary and other local schools will continue to face difficult financial challenges because classes won’t be full. Schools are largely funded on a ‘per pupil’ basis i.e. how many pupils attend the school.

 

The Council has a duty of care to ensure children in its schools are able to receive a good education and to access the full curriculum. A school with a declining roll will be challenged to do this effectively because of inevitable financial pressures from reduced funding.

 

Schools in the local area currently have a significant surplus of places and current school roll projections do not indicate any future demographic growth before 2026/27 and possibly beyond. In view of this, the Regional Schools Commissioner agreed for the Council to consider alternative options in parallel  ...  view the full minutes text for item 164.

165.

Closure of Osborne Grove Nursing Home pending redevelopment pdf icon PDF 217 KB

[Report of the Director of Adults and Health. To be introduced by the Cabinet Member for Adults and Health]

 

This report requests Cabinet consider the outcome of the consultation on the proposal  to close  Osborne Grove Nursing Home  to allow for the development of an expanded 70 bed nursing home provision on site to meet current and future care needs in the Borough.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Cabinet Member for Adults and Health introduced the report which provided feedback from the statutory consultation to close the home in order to enable a redeveloped improved facility with increased beds for this nursing home. The report included, the equalities impact assessment of the proposal, the analysis of the issues and the legal duties required make a decision on the proposal to close the Home.

 

The Cabinet Member referred to the Cabinet decision in July 2019, to build a new 70-bed nursing home on the Osborne Grove site, which demonstrated the Council’s commitment to providing high-quality nursing care in the borough and represented a major investment in new facilities. As demand for nursing care continues to grow there was a need to increase the supply of residential nursing care places which the redevelopment would provide for.

 

The Feasibility Study had determined that the redevelopment of Osborne Grove would have implications for the current residents, in terms of health and personal wellbeing due to the inevitable disruption that would result from the building work and site preparation. Therefore an extensive consultation has been undertaken and this report sets out the findings and recommendations to proceed.

 

Following a question from Councillor Barnes, it was noted that residents of the care home had been moved to alternative ‘good’ or ‘outstanding’ provision.

 

 

RESOLVED

 

 

  1. To consider and take into account the feedback from the consultation set out in section 6.

 

  1. To consider and take into account the Equalities Impact Assessment undertaken at Appendix 1 which includes actions proposed to mitigate the impact of the proposed closure on protected groups.

 

 

  1. Having considered the above, to agree to the closure of Osborne Grove Nursing Home to allow for the demolition works and construction of a new 70 bed nursing home on site.

 

  1. To agree that the closure be subject to an implementation plan that includes:

a)    engagement with all stakeholders including service users and carers;

b)    the re-assessment or review of the care and support needs of service users with a view to identifying suitable alternative provision to meet assessed needs; and

c)    Individual transition plan that is sensitive to the needs of service users, mitigates the impact of the closure, ensures the process of change is safely handled and the care and support needs of the service user continue to be met.

 

  1. To agree that the closure is managed in accordance with the Managing Care Home Closures Good Practice Guide and Management Checklist approved by the CQC.

 

 

Reasons for decision

 

In June 2018 a decision was taken by Cabinet to stop the previously agreed closure of the Home, pending a feasibility study to be undertaken for the future development of the site. Part of this decision was that the existing residents should be allowed to remain in the Home if they choose, pending the outcome of the feasibility study report.

 

In July 2019 the feasibility report was presented to Cabinet and they agreed to endorse the preferred option: that is, to demolish the current  ...  view the full minutes text for item 165.

166.

Community Equipment Contract pdf icon PDF 192 KB

[Report of the Director of Adults and Health. To be introduced by the Cabinet Member for Adults and Health]

 

This report considers the variation of the contract value with Medequip Assistive Technologies over the next 3 years.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Cabinet Member for Adults and Health introduced this report which considered the variation of the contract value with Medequip Assistive Technologies over the next 3 years.

 

The Cabinet Member highlighted that the provision of community equipment supported vulnerable people and their families to maintain healthy, safe and independent lives within their own homes, reducing the need for more complex and costly care, helping support the Council’s budget position. It was therefore positive that demand and therefore the volumes of equipment provided have increased and the proposal in this paper will enable this to continue for the next three years.

 

 

RESOLVED

 

  1. To approve variation of the contract value over the next 3 years, increasing it by £3.6million (£1.2m per year), from April 2020 to March 2023.

 

  1. To approve a two-year extension of the contract from April 2021 to March 2023.

 

Reasons for decision

 

Cabinet originally approved a contract value of £5 million in February 2017 for the 4-year duration of the contract ending March 31st, 2021, with the option to extend for a further 1+1 years or 7.2m over the full term

 

Since then;

 

  • Additional services have been granted permission to procure through this contract, namely Special Educational Needs & Disabilities (SEND), Paediatric Therapy Team at Whittington and Community Alarm Team (CAS) who procure their stock through the contract.
  • Additional community equipment has also been made available to facilitate hospital discharges, prevent hospital admissions and to enable the residents of Haringey to remain in their home environment. Equipment includes, specialist Chairs, the Installation of key safes and manual Hoists.

 

All of the above contributed to a 22% increase in spend across the wholecontract from £1.34 million in 2017-18 to £1.64 million in 2018-19. The current year 2019-20 has projected a further 10% an increase to £1.8 million.

 

Of the £1.64 million spent in 2018-19 only £614,000 was attributable to Adult Social Care with the remaining (£1.02 million) being re-charged back to other services namely;

 

  • Haringey CCG - £839,000
  • Community Alarm Services - £77,000
  • Special Educational Needs & Disabilities - £62,000
  • Whittington Paediatric Therapies - £47,000

 

The CCG figure of £839,000 represents an increase in spending of 16% from the previous financial year as opposed to just over a 1% increase by Adult Social Care. Therefore, it is expected that any increased spending will be attributable to the CCG and they will be recharged accordingly.

 

Given the reasons already highlighted, the original value will not suffice until the end of the contract.

 

.

Alternative options considered

 

The London Consortium completed an options appraisal where re-tendering was considered. However, given the price efficiencies, value for money and quality of delivery demonstrated it was concluded that this would not be beneficial option and would risk disrupting service provision.

 

167.

Award of contract to a Positive Behavioural Support (PBS) provider from PBS framework pdf icon PDF 495 KB

[Report of the Director of Adults and Health. To be introduced by the Cabinet Member for Adults and Health]

 

This report details the outcome of a mini-competition process conducted under the Council’s Positive Behaviour Support (PBS) Services Framework Agreement and seeks approval to award a ‘Call-Off’ contract to the successful tenderer.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Cabinet Member was delighted to present the report which enabled the Council to bring back into use two sites at Waltheof Gardens for day opportunities for people with a range of needs. The key focus of the report was the provision of care and support to people with complex learning disabilities and autism, potentially with behaviours that challenge, in a day opportunities setting to enable them to lead fulfilling lives.

 

The Cabinet Member advised that the Council were using the Positive Behaviour Support Framework because the people taking up this provision will have a range of needs which can be best supported by the tailored and specialist offer of a skilled positive behaviour support provider. This provider was a voluntary sector organisation delivering London Living Wage to all its employees and who would be working with the Council to enhance staff skills and capability in this area.

 

Further to considering exempt information at item 26,

 

 

RESOLVED

 

 

  1. To agree an increase to the total value of the PBS Framework from £7,000,000 to £10,500,000; and

 

  1. Pursuant to CSO 7.01 (b) (by selecting one or more contractors from a Framework) and CSO 9.07.01(d) (All contracts valued at £500,000 or more may only be awarded by Cabinet), to award a contract for PBS day opportunities services to the successful bidder for a period of four years (4) from 1 April 2020 to 31 March 2024 and a maximum value of £3,500,000 (three million five hundred thousand pounds) under the PBS Framework.

 

Reasons for decision

 

The PBS framework was let in 2017 at a value of £7,000,000 (seven million pounds) over a four-year period. Whilst take-up of the framework was slow at the start, there has been renewed interest as the Council has redeveloped three Council owned assets and brought two new and significant services into the borough: supported living provision at Linden Road for people with very complex needs and day opportunities provision on two sites at Waltheof Gardens, again for people with complex learning disabilities and autism. The nature of the positive behaviour support (PBS) service offered is highly specialised to meet the complex and varied needs of the individuals involved. The fact that these services are coming on stream together means that the value of the framework needs to be increased, with the cost of the approach exceeding the original estimates. The framework did not guarantee any volume or value of work to the providers admitted to it. It remains the case that the scope of the framework will not change, and that the PBS service delivery approach will return cost efficiencies and assist the Council to meet its Medium-Term Financial Strategy (MTFS) savings targets.

 

All five framework participants were invited to tender. The tenderers’ proposals were evaluated using a 50% quality and 50% price weighting and, on this basis, the recommended Provider is deemed to be the most economically advantageous tender representing the best value option to deliver the required service.

 

Alternative options considered

 

The option not to proceed was  ...  view the full minutes text for item 167.

168.

Canning Crescent Mental Health Recovery Centre pdf icon PDF 182 KB

[Report of the Director of Adults and Health. To be introduced by the Cabinet Member for Adults and Health]

 

 

This report sets out how the Council and NHS can contribute to meeting local need by bringing together a range of services in a single approach at Canning Crescent, recently acquired by the Council.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Cabinet Member for Adults and Health introduced this report which set out how the Council and NHS can contribute to meeting local need by bringing together a range of services in a single approach at Canning Crescent, recently acquired by the Council.

 

The Cabinet Member welcomed this proposal coming forward as part of the manifesto commitment to improving health and wellbeing in Haringey. The model of recovery services proposed for Canning Crescent have learnt from services and research around the world so would help provide the highest quality of services for residents.

 

The Cabinet Member highlighted that the Council was committed to the services being co-produced with residents who have lived experience of mental health conditions, building on the excellent work already happening at the Council’s Clarendon Recovery College. Moving to Canning Crescent and integrating with other services, will allow the creation of more jobs and volunteering opportunities for residents living with mental illness.

 

The Cabinet Member noted that the services here were a key part of delivering on the vision for early intervention and would help to prevent homelessness, hospitalisation, relationship breakdowns and other harmful life events. The Council’s proposal sustained the best of this award-winning building, in order to provide a therapeutic and attractive environment that would be accessible and inclusive for people with a range of needs and demonstrate our commitment to providing positive and quality spaces.

 

The Cabinet Member closed by noting this development offered a key contribution to the wider regeneration of Wood Green, bringing its benefits to residents who may be facing multiple challenges and demonstrated the Council’s commitment in their inclusion in the community of Haringey.

 

RESOLVED

 

To agree the redevelopment of the Canning Crescent site for the costs set out in paragraph 6.6 of this report as an integrated, mixed use adult mental health recovery centre for the purpose of accommodating the Clarendon Recovery college, a crisis support service (identified as the “safe haven” service in this report) and a crisis house/respite accommodation (identified as the “Recovery House” in this report)

 

Reasons for decision

 

Improving mental health in the borough is a Council priority and this scheme forms part of an approach to deliver excellence through integrating services across the Council, the NHS and other partners.

 

Whilst the current sites for the Recovery College and Recovery House were not purpose designed and would benefit from improvement, bringing the services together on this site offers a further and substantial opportunity to improve the models in both services and the facilities from which they operate. These changes will drive better outcomes and greater preventative benefit for residents and the Council, particularly in relation to prevention of need for adult social care and homelessness services.

 

There is a need to relocate the Council-run Clarendon Recovery College so its current site can be redeveloped, generating a capital receipt for the Council and contributing to the wider housing delivery which is also a priority for the Council.

 

The Council has been commissioned by NHS Haringey CCG  ...  view the full minutes text for item 168.

169.

1-35 Headcorn Road & 51-92 Tenterden Road - Fire Safety Works pdf icon PDF 278 KB

[Report of the Director of Housing, Regeneration and Planning. To be introduced by the Cabinet Member for Housing and Estate Renewal]

 

This report requests Cabinet approval for the award of a contract for the installation of Automatic Fire Detection (AFD) and associated works at 1-35 Headcorn Road and 51-92 Tenterden Road. This will be to ensure they are compliant with current fire safety requirements and regulations.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Cabinet Member for Housing and Estate Renewal introduced the report which sought approval for the award of a contract for the installation of Automatic Fire Detection (AFD) and associated works at 1-35 Headcorn Road and 51-92 Tenterden Road. This will be to ensure they are compliant with current fire safety requirements and regulations.

 

The Cabinet Member outlined that Headcorn and Tenterden blocks were timber framed buildings. Within these type of structures, it is very difficult to maintain full compartmentation throughout the life and use of the building. Following intrusive surveys of the structure, Homes for Haringey could not be assured that full current compartmentation meets current Building Regulation Standards or conforms to The Regulatory (Fire Safety) Order.

 

Following a fire engineering survey, a recommended solution had been developed to ensure that full simultaneous evacuation of the buildings can take place in the event of fire.

 

The Cabinet Member highlighted to colleagues that this report contained a recommendation for no recharge to leaseholders as set out at recommendation 5.

 

Further to considering exempt information at item 27,

 

RESOLVED

 

 

  1. Pursuant to the Council’s Contract Standing Order (CSO) 9.07.1(d), approve the award of a contract to the successful tenderer (named in the exempt part of the report) for the installation of Automatic Fire Detection (AFD) and associated works to 1-35 Headcorn Road and 51-92 Tenterden Road, in the sum of £604,755.54.

 

  1. Under the Council’s Contract Standing Order (CSO) 9.07.3, to approve the issue of a letter of intent for an amount of up to, but not exceeding £60,475.55, which represents 10% of the contract sum.

 

 

  1. To approve the total professional fees of £53,158, which represents 8.79% of the contract sum.

 

  1. To note the total project costs of £657,914.

 

.

  1. To agree that there will be no recharge of the cost of the works to the leaseholders of properties included in their scope, for the reasons set out in item 8.2.

 

Reasons for decision

 

Homes for Haringey requires Cabinet approval to award the contract for the installation of AFD and associated works to the timber framed buildings at 1- 35 Headcorn and 51-92 Tenterden Road. This will enable essential safety works to commence. This is following a tender process undertaken in conjunction with Haringey Council’s Procurement team via Constructionline (which is a UK register of pre-qualified construction services database fully owned and managed by Capita) whereby contractors are invited to provide competitive e-tenders via the Delta e-Sourcing Portal.

 

The tender process was carried out in in line with Contract Standing Orders (CSO) requirements that incorporate price and quality. The successful compliant bidder scored the highest in relation to these criteria.

 

Alternative options considered

 

An alternative option would be for Homes for Haringey to use third party industry frameworks. Homes for Haringey sought support and advice from Haringey Strategic Procurement and determined that Constructionline was the optimum route to market.

 

The option of using Haringey Repairs Service (HRS) was considered. However this was discounted because of the urgency in delivering the scheme, the specialist  ...  view the full minutes text for item 169.

170.

Installation of Automatic Fire Detection (AFD) to Scattered Victorian & Edwardian dwellings pdf icon PDF 209 KB

[Report of the Director of Housing, Regeneration and Planning. To be introduced by the Cabinet Member for Housing and Estate Renewal]

 

This report seeks approval for the award of a contract for the installation of Automatic Fire Detection (AFD) and associated works to converted scattered Victorian and Edwardian street dwellings.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Cabinet Member for Housing and Estate Renewal introduced this report which sought approval for the award of a contract for the installation of Automatic Fire Detection (AFD) and associated works to converted scattered Victorian and Edwardian street dwellings.

 

The Cabinet Member noted that the Street Property Victorian Houses that were converted into flats in the late 1960s and 1970s, would not meet current Building Regulation Standards or conform to The Regulatory (Fire Safety) Order. Guidance recommended that where full compartmentation cannot be assured these types of properties would be best served by the installation of an Automatic Fire Detection system. This system with the appropriate upgrade of the fire doors and means of escape route would allow early simultaneously evacuation of the building in case a fire breaks out in any flat.

 

The Cabinet Member closed by drawing Cabinet’s attention to the recommendations, including noting the full cost of the works. It was noted that the leaseholders would be charged for the works carried out.

 

In response to questions from Councillor das Neves and Barnes, the following information was provided:

 

  • The Cabinet Member noted all wards in the borough were affected by the scattered Edwardian and Victorian dwellings.

 

  • Regarding reference to the report stating Councillors had been consulted, Officers informed that they would check what involvement the Councillors had had in the process. The Cabinet Member added that the key decision had been listed on the Forward Plan for a significant period of time.

 

 

  • Regarding the decision as to why the affected leaseholders in this report would be charged for the work carried out whilst those affected leaseholders at item 19 – ‘1-35 Headcorn Road and 51-92 Tenterden Road – Fire Safety Works’ were not being charged for those works carried out, was because the latter was to do with the structure of the whole building, which the Council had a responsibility to ensure was maintained. Where leaseholders had exercised their right to buy and purchased their Victorian or Edwardian property, there would have been an assessment carried out which would have made those leaseholders aware that they could be charged in the future for such works.

 

  • Officers noted that at Headcorn and Tenterden, works had been carried out in the past where leaseholders had financially contributed towards those works. It was arguable that those works should have included work either to improve the compartmentation or fit the fire detection. It was also arguable that those works could have contributed to the problem.

 

Further to considering exempt information at item 28,

 

 

RESOLVED

 

 

  1. Pursuant to the Council’s Contract Standing Order (CSO) 9.07.1 (d), to approve the award of contract to the successful tenderer (named in the exempt part of the report) for the installation of Automatic Fire Detection (AFD) and associated works, in the sum of £7,876,259.98.

 

  1. To approve the issuing of a letter of intent for an amount of up to, but not exceeding, £787,625.99. This represents 10% of the contract sum.

 

 

  1. To approve the total professional  ...  view the full minutes text for item 170.

171.

Amendment to London Councils Transport and Environment Committee Agreement pdf icon PDF 238 KB

[Report of the Director of Housing, Regeneration and Planning. To be introduced by the Cabinet Member for Climate Change and Sustainability]

 

This report is seeking Cabinet to approve the delegation of additional functions to the London Councils' Transport and Environment Committee Agreement (LCTEC Agreement). It would provide London Councils TEC with the authority to take on the operational management and strategic oversight of a London-wide residential electric vehicle charging point delivery partnership on behalf of London's local authorities, if required.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Cabinet Member for Climate Change and Sustainability introduced the report which sought approval for delegation of authority to London Councils Transport and Environment Committee to vary a committee agreement which would enable TEC [Transport and Environment Committee] to exercise further functions under section 16 of the London Local Authorities and Transport Act 2013. This would in turn enable London Councils to develop a new electric vehicle co-ordination function and to carry out the additional functions to support boroughs in delivering uptake of Electrical vehicles.

 

In agreeing this variation, the Council will be supporting a London wide approach to Electric Vehicle charging infrastructure. The aim of this variation was to allow London Councils to deliver a Management organisation for electric vehicle charging. This was currently not permitted under the existing terms of TEC, hence this variation and the Council’s agreement was needed. This new company had the potential to reduce costs for London Authorities, while creating a single point of contact for all electric vehicles charging needs. This could benefit the Council and residents and businesses. Once designed the Council can then decide to take up the offer to join this new company. This was also a positive step in delivering air quality objectives.

 

The following information was provided in response to questions from Cllr Barnes:

 

  • The Council would only sign up to the company, if it met the borough’s electric vehicle charging needs. The Cabinet Member was keen on uniformity and efficiency and having fast charging points for electrical vehicles in a place where they do not impede people’s progression the pavement.

 

  • The agreement to set up a company would include exploring the issues concerning the mode of EV charging in comparison to another, i.e. rapid charging or streetlamp charging. The company would likely consider these issues and hopefully put forward a consistent approach.

 

  • The Cabinet Member agreed to provide Cllr Barnes a written response to her question on Haringey expanding its EV installation guidance to include further use of roads for future modes of travel, so to include change of use parking bays into dockless bays or park lets so a future proof design and implementation guide that can change as needs arise.

 

 

RESOLVED

 

 

  1. To approve the delegation of authority to London Councils Transport and Environment Committee to exercise further functions under section 16 of the London Local Authorities and Transport Act 2013, to enable London Councils to develop a new electric vehicle co-ordination function and to carry out the additional functions to support boroughs in delivering uptake of EV’s as set out in paragraph 4.6 in the report and Appendices A and B.

 

  1. To delegate authority to the Director of Housing, Regeneration, and planning to sign any necessary documents to give effect to the variation of the London Council’s Transport and Environment Committee Governing Agreement dated 13 December 2001, as amended.

 

Reasons for decision

 

In 2016, the Go Ultra Low Cities Scheme (GULCS) funding bid submitted byte GLA, London Councils, and TfL proposed the delivery of London-wide  ...  view the full minutes text for item 171.

172.

The Acquisition of the Freehold interest in Alexandra House, Station Road, Wood Green pdf icon PDF 204 KB

[Report of the Director for Housing, Planning and Regeneration. To  be introduced  by the Cabinet Member for Finance and Strategic Regeneration.]

 

The report will recommend the acquisition of the freehold interest in Alexandra House from the Ability Group.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Leader introduced this report which recommended the acquisition of the freehold interest in Alexandra House.

 

The Leader informed that the Council’s accommodation needs had changed in the previous twelve months and the Council’s strategic ambition for Wood Green had evolved meaning that Alexandra House now had greater importance to the Council than before.

 

The Leader highlighted there had always been a strategic case for acquisition to support the redevelopment of the area along the axis of River Park Road/ Station Road but the separate ownership of Alexandra House presented significantly lower risk to this long term vision when Alexandra House was owned by Workspace whose stated intention for Alexandra House was for it to remain as employment space. Now that the alternative is residential development of a nature that could not be supported for strategic reasons, there was a much stronger argument for acquisition on both operational and strategic land use bases.

 

The Leader closed by noting that, in considering whether to acquire, the Council needed to base a decision on operational and strategic reasons supported by an assessment of the cost implications. Officers had looked at several aspects of this including considering the costs the Council would face if the building was not acquired.

 

Further to considering exempt information at item 29,

 

RESOLVED

 

 

  1. To agree to the acquisition of the freehold interest in Alexandra House, 10 Station Road (as outlined red in the plan in Appendix A) on terms set out in Part B.

 

  1. This resolution is set out in exempt part of the report

 

 

  1. To give delegated authority to the Director of Housing, Regeneration and Planning after consultation with the Lead Member for Finance and Strategic Regeneration to approve the final Heads of Terms and all other documentations required to give effect to the acquisition.

 

  1. This resolution is set out in exempt part of the report

 

 

  1. This resolution is set out in exempt part of the report

 

  1. This resolution is set out in exempt part of the report

 

Reasons for decision

 

The Council has the opportunity to acquire the freehold of Alexandra House, currently in use as office space by the Council under a business lease that is due to expire in mid- February 2021. The reason for the acquisition is in the first instance operational, to provide the Council with flexible office accommodation over the coming years whilst the medium-term accommodation strategy is approved and implemented, and in the short term to manage decant and works to River Park House.

 

A number of reports and studies undertaken in the last six months about the Council’s current office accommodation have shown that the Council has a greater requirement for office accommodation in the short and medium term than previously understood, supporting the need to retain Alexandra House for operational reasons. The property is currently under contract to be sold and the new purchaser has indicated that they would oppose a new lease should the Council request one once the existing lease expires in February 2021.

 

The current  ...  view the full minutes text for item 172.

173.

Minutes of Other Bodies pdf icon PDF 192 KB

To note the minutes of the following:

 

·         Cabinet Member  Signing 17 January 2020

·         Leader’s decision 20 January 2020

Additional documents:

Minutes:

RESOLVED

 

To note the Cabinet Member signing minutes for 17th and 20th of January 2020.

 

174.

New Items of Urgent Business

To consider any items admitted at Item 3 above.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

None

175.

Exclusion of the Press and Public

Note from the Acting Democratic Services and Scrutiny Manager

 

Items 26 to 31 allow for consideration of exempt information in relation to

Items 17, 19,  20, and 22.

 

TO RESOLVE

 

That the press and public be excluded from the remainder of the meeting as

the items below, contain exempt information, as defined under paragraph 3

and 5, Part 1, schedule 12A of the Local Government Act:

·         Information relating to the financial or business affairs of any particular person (including the authority holding that information).

·         Information in respect of which a claim to legal professional privilege could be maintained in legal proceedings.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

That the press and public be excluded from the remainder of the meeting as the remaining items contained exempt information as defined under paragraph 3 and 5 of Part 1 schedule 12A of the Local Government Act 1972.

 

176.

Award of contract to a Positive Behavioural Support (PBS) provider from PBS framework

As per item 17.

Minutes:

As per item 167 and the exempt minutes.

177.

1-35 Headcorn Road & 51-92 Tenterden Road - Fire Safety Works

As per item 19.

Minutes:

As per item 169 and the exempt minutes.

 

178.

Installation of Automatic Fire Detection (AFD) to Scattered Victorian & Edwardian dwellings

As per item 20.

Minutes:

As per item 170 and the exempt minutes.

 

179.

The Acquisition of the Freehold interest in Alexandra House, Station Road, Wood Green

As per item 22.

Minutes:

As per item 172 and the exempt minutes.

 

180.

Exempt Minutes

To agree the exempt minutes of cabinet held on the 21st January 2020.

Minutes:

RESOLVED

 

To approve the exempt minutes of the 21st of January 2019 meeting as a correct record

 

181.

New Items of Exempt Urgent Business

To consider any items admitted at Item 3 above.

 

Minutes:

None